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6 Cars That Have the Steering Wheel on the Right Side

6 Cars That Have the Steering Wheel on the Right Side

In the U.S., there are only two types of cars that have the steering wheel on the right side.

Those that belong to the government and gray market vehicles.

One of the most defining features of any car is the placement of the steering wheel.

Often the placement of the steering is made to coincide with the laws of the country in which the car was manufactured.

Typically, countries that have been under British rule have right-handed drive (RHD) cars.

Here in the United States, we’ve adopted a left-handed mode of driving that’s worked out pretty well so far.

Below are six cars that have the steering wheel on the right side.

1. Mail Trucks

U.S. Mail trucks have the steering wheel on the right side.

A perfect example of cars that have the steering wheel on the right side is a postal or mail truck.

Postal trucks are U.S. government vehicles designed to be right-handed because in America we drive on the right.

So, an RHD mail truck puts the postal carrier closer to the curb, making it easier to deposit mail in a mailbox without having to leave the driver’s seat.

2. Garbage Trucks

Garbage trucks can have the steering wheel on both the right and left side.

If you’re observant, then you’ve no doubt noticed that some garbage trucks have steering wheels on both the left and right side.

Why?

Notice how in the image above the garbage truck is picking up receptacles on the right side of the street.

Like mail trucks having the steering wheel on either side gets the driver closer to the curb which increases visibility for the safety of everyone.

3. Jeep

Jeep Wrangler with the steering wheel on the right.

image source: AutoTrader

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Although Jeep is an American car manufacturer, did you know that the company produces vehicles that are right-hand drive?

Mostly, these Jeeps are intended for rural mail delivery in the U.S. where the climate is intense.

And yes, Jeep is still producing right hand drive vehicles like this Wrangler. Do you know what this means?

You can walk into your neighborhood Jeep dealership and tell them you want an RHD Jeep, and they’ll fix you right up.

4. Mercedes Benz

Mercedes S Class coupe convertible with the steering wheel on the right.

Another example of cars that have the steering wheel on the right side are cars made in Europe.

Mercedes-Benz and Daimler are global brands.

As such, CEO Ola Kallenius has confirmed the company’s commitment to producing right hand drive vehicles.

Vehicles like this 7th generation S-Class.

And like the S-Classes before it, this one is forward-looking with technologies like connectivity, digitization electrification and autonomy that will surely trickle down to more affordable options in the not too distant future.

5. Nissan R34 Skyline

Nissan Skyline R34 with the steering wheel on the right.

image source: TopGear

Here’s a fantastic example of cars that have the steering wheel on the right side from over seas.

The Nissan R34 Skyline is a perfect example of a gray market vehicle imported into the U.S. that’s designed to be right hand drive.

Grey market cars were originally sold in another country where they are purchased and imported into the United States.

These cars were usually never approved for in the American market.

Right-hand grey market cars include JDM (Japanese Domestic Market) as well as cars originally sold in Britain, Australia and other countries where cars are driven on the left lane.

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6. BMW 1 Series

BMW 1 Series with the steering wheel on the right.

image source: CarScoops

In Europe, a car like this right-hand drive BMW 1-Series is completely normal. In the United States, this is what’s known as a gray market vehicle.

The BMW 1 Series is a 5-door hatchback configuration that was never offered in the U.S.

When this particular 1 Series was imported into the United States by the current owner, it garnered some unwanted attention.

Namely some people suspected the car was brought into the U.S. illegally.

Importing cars into the U.S. has its headaches.

Source:

Autotrader.com; Automotiveex.com; Truckauthority.com; Carsales.com.au; Topgear.com